Post Office Box 2098, El Cerrito, California 94530
Telephone: 510.525.2744 Facsimile: 510.525.2772
Email: info@californiastatehumane.org

Home Site Map

 

About Us

Membership

Training

Humane Officers

Legislation

Catalog

Conference

Careers

SPCAs

Get Updates
from SHAC



Twitter Facebook

 

State Humane Association of California - Legislation

Legislation

Bills Introduced in 2017
        
Bills Signed into Law in 2016
        
Frequently Asked Questions

Let us know what animal welfare legislation you think should be enacted in California. Email us.

 

Key Animal-Related Bills Introduced during 2017

Bill No.
Legislator
Name

Summary Position Status

AB 292
Steinorth 

Personal income tax: deductions: qualified pet adoption costs.

This bill, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2018, and before January 1, 2023, would allow a deduction, not to exceed $100, under that law for the qualified costs paid or incurred by a taxpayer for the adoption of a qualified pet, as defined, from a qualified animal rescue organization.

ASSEMBLY -  
Held under submission.

Support 

AB 411
Bloom 

Witness testimony: therapy and facility dogs.

This bill would authorize prosecuting witnesses, as well as certain child witnesses, to be accompanied by a dog, trained in providing emotional support, while testifying. This bill would require the court to allow the witness to be accompanied by the dog if certain conditions are met, but would reserve the discretion of the court to remove or exclude the dog in certain specified situations. The bill would require the court to take appropriate measures to minimize the distraction created by the presence of the dog in the courtroom, including requiring the dog to be accompanied by a handler at all times. The bill would require the court, if requested, to give appropriate jury instructions if a dog is utilized in a criminal jury trial, to prevent prejudice against any party.

CHAPTERED

 

AB 485
O'Donnell 

Pet store operators: dogs, cats, and rabbits.

This bill would prohibit a pet store operator from selling a live dog, cat, or rabbit in a pet store unless the dog, cat, or rabbit was obtained from a public animal control agency or shelter, society for the prevention of cruelty to animals shelter, humane society shelter, or rescue group that is in a cooperative agreement with at least one private or public shelter, as specified. Existing law authorizes a public or private shelter to enter into cooperative agreements with animal rescue or adoption organizations regarding dogs and cats. This bill would authorize a public or private shelter to enter into cooperative agreements with animal rescue or adoption organizations regarding rabbits that are equivalent to the cooperative agreements authorized regarding dogs and cats described above.

CHAPTERED

Support 

AB 521
Frazier 

Hunting: elk tags: fees for residents.

This bill would reduce the fee for a resident elk tag to $100 and would prohibit the fee from being adjusted, except pursuant to an analysis of the fee to ensure that the appropriate fee amount is charged and a recommendation to the Legislature or the Fish and Game Commission that the fee be adjusted. The bill would also authorize the department, until January 1, 2024, to issue not more than 30 apprentice elk hunt tags to residents of the state for a fee of $20, and would prohibit any adjustment of that fee.    

SENATE -
Failed

 

AB 573
Bigelow 

Depredation: wild pigs: damage guidelines.

Under existing law, any owner or tenant of land or property that is being damaged or destroyed or is in danger of being damaged or destroyed by wild pig may apply to the Department of Fish and Wildlife for a permit to kill that animal. Existing law provides that any wild pig that is encountered while in the act of inflicting injury to, or damaging or destroying, or threatening to immediately damage or destroy, land or other property may be taken immediately by the owner or the owner's employee or agent, as specified. This bill would require the guidelines to consider additional factors and would require the department to update the guidelines as needed.

Failed (May be acted upon Jan 2018)

 

AB 628
Chen 

Animal control: seizure of animals: costs.

Existing law requires a peace officer, humane society officer, or animal control officer to take possession of a stray or abandoned animal, or any animal when the officer has reasonable grounds to believe that very prompt action is required to protect the health and safety of the animal or the health and safety of others. In the case of taking possession of a stray or abandoned animal, existing law requires the officer to provide care and treatment for the animal until the animal is deemed to be in suitable condition to be returned to the owner. This bill would require a seizing organization or entity to provide care and treatment for a seized animal until the animal is placed, returned to the owner, or euthanized.

Hearing cancelled
 (May be acted upon Jan 2018)

Sponsor 

AB 942
Mathis 

Personal income taxes: credit: veterinary costs.

The Personal Income Tax Law allows various credits against the taxes imposed by that law. This bill would allow a credit against those taxes for each taxable year beginning on or after January 1, 2017, and before January 1, 2023, in an amount equal to 50% of the amount paid or incurred during the taxable year by a taxpayer for qualified veterinary costs, as defined, for a taxpayer’s pets, as defined, not to exceed $2,000 per taxable year.

ASSEMBLY -
Revised

Support 

AB 1137
Maienschein 

Housing developments: pet permissibility.

This bill would require the Department of Housing and Community Development in the Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency to require each housing development, as defined, that is financed on or after January 1, 2018, pursuant to various provisions of existing law, to authorize a resident of the housing development to own or otherwise maintain one or more common household pets, as defined, within the resident’s dwelling unit, subject to applicable state laws, department regulations, and local government ordinances related to public health, animal control, and animal anticruelty.

CHAPTERED

Support 

AB 1138
Maienschein 

Sale of cats or dogs.

This bill would make it unlawful for specified people and entities, in specified mediums, to advertise, call attention to, or give publicity to the sale or transfer of a dog or cat which the statements about or pictures of the dog or cat are made or presented without the actual intent to sell or offer the exact dog or cat advertised or the statements about the dog or cat being advertised or offered for sale are known to be untrue or misleading. The bill would make a violation of these provisions a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment in the county jail not exceeding 6 months, or by a fine not exceeding $2,500, or by both that imprisonment and fine.

Vetoed by Governor 

Support 

AB 1151
Gloria 

Vaquita-harmful fish and fish products.

This bill would make it unlawful to sell, offer for sale, trade, or distribute fish products that are not vaquita-friendly, as defined. By creating a new crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

Ordered to inactive file

 

AB 1199
Nazarian 

Peace officer training: dogs.

This bill would require Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) to develop and implement training for peace officers regarding encounters with dogs. This bill would also require specified law enforcement officers, including municipal police officers and county sheriff’s deputies, to receive that training. By requiring these officers to perform this training, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.

ASSEMBLY -
Held under submission.

 

AB 1250
Bonta and Fletcher 

Counties: contracts for personal services.

This bill would establish specific standards for the use of personal services contracts by counties. Beginning January 1, 2018, the bill would allow a county or county agency to contract for personal services currently or customarily performed by employees, as applicable, when specified conditions are met. Among other things, the bill would require the county to clearly demonstrate that the proposed contract will result in actual overall costs savings to the county and also to show that the contract does not cause the displacement of county workers.

SENATE -
Re-referred to Com. on Rules.

Oppose 

AB 1491
Caballero 

Sales of dogs and cats: contracts and advertising.

This bill would declare a contract entered into on or after January 1, 2018, to transfer ownership of a dog or cat in which ownership is contingent upon the making of payments over a period of time subsequent to the transfer of possession of the dog or cat void as against public policy unless those payments are on an unsecured loan for the purchase of that animal. This bill would also declare a contract entered into on or after January 1, 2018, for the lease of a dog or cat that provides for or offers the option of transferring ownership of the dog or cat at the end of the lease term void as against public policy. The bill would require that the consumer taking possession of a dog or cat transferred under the terms of one of these contracts be deemed the owner of the dog or cat and be entitled to return all amounts paid under the contract.

CHAPTERED

Support 

AB 1544
Dahle 

Hunting: nonlead ammunition.

This bill would require the Fish and Game Commission to temporarily suspend the latter prohibition for a specific hunting season and caliber if the commission finds that nonlead ammunition of the specific caliber is not available for any reason. The bill would require the commission, on or before January 1, 2019, to adopt criteria to determine when nonlead ammunition is not available for purposes of this provision and would require those criteria to include regional availability and cost of nonlead ammunition. The bill would prohibit a suspension from remaining in effect for longer than 3 years. The bill would require the commission to make any finding that nonlead ammunition is not available publicly available on the its Internet Web site.    

Hearing cancelled at request of author. (May be acted upon Jan 2018)

 

AB 1569
Caballero 

Disability rights: reasonable accommodations: animals.

This bill, if a prospective or current tenant requests a disability-related reasonable accommodation to keep an animal on the real property and the disability is not readily apparent or the disability-related need for an animal is not apparent, would authorize a person renting, leasing, or otherwise providing real property for compensation to request that a prospective or current tenant provide reliable verification of the disability and the disability-related need for the animal. The bill would require that the third party, among other things, have specific knowledge of the prospective or current tenant’s medical condition based on an individualized examination. The bill would exclude from these provisions guide dogs and service animals, as those terms are defined in specified statutes.

Hearing cancelled at request of author. (May be acted upon Jan 2018)

 

SB 30
Lara 

California-Mexico border: federally funded infrastructure.

Existing law establishes the border between the United States and Mexico, which includes the southern border of California.This bill would make findings and declarations related to a wall on the border between California and Mexico.

Hearing cancelled at request of author.

 

SB 183
Lara 

Marine protected areas: Native American tribes.

This bill would authorize a California Native American tribe to submit a request to the Native American Heritage Commission to approve the tribe’s record of aboriginal use of a specified area of the marine environment for subsistence and cultural purposes. Upon approval by the Native American Heritage Commission of the tribe’s record of aboriginal use, the bill would authorize the tribe to request, and would require the Fish and Game Commission to issue, an exemption that authorizes members and lineal descendants of the tribe to engage in subsistence fishing and cultural gathering and use of live plants and dead animals within any state marine conservation area or state marine park located in the area described in the approval where the aboriginal use occurred.

Failed Deadline (May be acted upon Jan 2018)

 

SB 216
Moorlach 

Property: wild animals.

Existing law provides animals that are wild by nature may be the subject of ownership while those animals are living only in specified circumstances. This bill would make nonsubstantive changes to that section of law. 

Failed Deadline (May be acted upon Jan 2018)

 

SB 234
Berryhill 

Fishing: local regulation: report.

This bill would require the Fish and Game Commission to undertake a survey and evaluation of local ordinances that regulate fishing and to submit the survey and evaluation to the Legislature in a report by December 31, 2018.     

Held in committee and under submission.

 

SB 290
Jackson 

Marine mammals and sea turtles: entanglement and stranding: emergency rescue services: grants.

This bill would, upon appropriation of moneys by the Legislature, require the Wildlife Health Center at the Davis campus of the University of California to provide grants to qualified organizations, as defined, that respond to marine mammal or sea turtle entanglement or stranding emergencies. The bill would require the grants to be issued on an emergency basis and not for the operating expenses of a qualified organization, except as specified.    

Vetoed by the Governor

 

SB 420
Monning 

State summary criminal history information: sentencing information.

This bill would include sentencing information in the state summary criminal history information record maintained by the Department of Justice and would require that information to be provided, if present in the department’s records at the time of the response, whenever state summary criminal history information is initially furnished to specified entities, including to authorized agencies and organizations for use for peace officer employment purposes.

CHAPTERED

Support 

SB 546
Hill 

Veterinary medicine.

This bill, in nonemergency situations and outpatient settings, would require that each time a veterinarian prescribes, administers, dispenses, or furnishes a dangerous drug or prescription medicine, unless in conjunction with surgery during an anesthetic procedure or emergency services, the veterinarian offer to provide the client with a consultation. The bill would further require a veterinarian to provide along with the consultation pharmaceutical literature or written information, when available, if requested by the client. This bill would require the Veterinary Medical Board to inspect at least 20% of veterinary premises on an annual basis and also inspect all new veterinary premises within one year of being issued a premises permit. The Veterinary Medicine Practice Act allows a person whose license or registration has been surrendered while under investigation, revoked or who has been placed on probation to petition the Veterinary Medical Board for reinstatement for modification of penalty after a period of not less than one year has elapsed from the effective date of the decision ordering the disciplinary action. This bill would extend that period to 3 years for petitions for reinstatement of a surrendered or revoked license and would extend that period to 2 years for petitions for early termination or modification of probation, unless otherwise authorized by the board in the revocation or surrender order or order imposing probation.

SENATE -
Held in committee and under submission.

 

SB 673
Newman 

Pet Lover’s specialized license plates.

This bill would substitute the Department of Food and Agriculture in place of the Veterinary Medical Board for the purposes of allocating funds from Specialized License Plate Fund. The bill would authorize rather than require the Department of Food and Agriculture to allocate funds to a nonprofit organization it selects for disbursal to qualifying spay and neuter facilities for the purpose of funding grants to providers of no-cost or low-cost animal sterilization services.

CHAPTERED

Support 

SB 741
Mendoza 

Charitable raffles.

This bill would authorize a private, nonprofit organization to conduct a raffle for the purpose of directly supporting specified beneficial or charitable purposes in California, or financially supporting another private, nonprofit, eligible organization, as defined, that performs those purposes if, among other requirements, the raffle is conducted at a fair, exposition, or exhibition conducted by, and with the authorization of, a district agricultural association, a county fair association, a citrus fruit fair association, or the California Exposition and State Fair, 50% of the gross receipts generated from the sale of raffle tickets are used to benefit or provide support for beneficial or charitable purposes, as defined, and the other 50% is paid to the winner.

Hearing cancelled at request of author.

 

SB 779
Hertzberg 

State summary criminal history information.

Existing law requires the Department of Justice to maintain state summary criminal history information, including the identification and criminal history of any person, such as name, date of birth, physical description, fingerprints, photographs, dates of arrests, arresting agencies and booking numbers, charges, dispositions, and similar data about the person. Existing law specifies to whom and the manner in which the state summary criminal history information may be released and for what purposes it may be used. This bill would make technical, nonsubstantive changes to that provision. 

Failed Deadline (May be acted upon Jan 2018)

 

SCR 23
Monning 

California Wildlife Day.

This measure would proclaim the Spring Equinox of every year as California Wildlife Day. 

CHAPTERED

 

SCR 39
Atkins 

Marine Mammal Rescue Day.

This measure would recognize April 27, 2017, as Marine Mammal Rescue Day and would commend the Marine Mammal Stranding Network for its continued commitment to the rescue, rehabilitation, and return of animals residing off the California coast.   

CHAPTERED

 

 

Key Animal-Related Bills Signed into Law during 2016

Bill No.

Name

Legislator

Summary

AB 797

Immunity from civil liability:damaging a motor vehicle: rescue or provision of care for minor or animal.

Steinorth

This bill would prohibit any civil liability or cause of action against a person for damage to a motor vehicle, if the damage was caused while the person was rescuing or providing care to a minor who, or animal that, was located inside the motor vehicle the person had taken specific steps, including, among others, determining the motor vehicle was locked or there was no reasonable method for the minor or animal to exit the motor vehicle without assistance, and to the extent practicable, contacted a law enforcement agency, fire department, or the emergency 911 telephone number before damaging the motor vehicle.

AB 1825

 

Vicious dogs: definition.

Gordon

Existing law provides for the designation and disposition of certain categories of dogs as potentially dangerous or vicious dogs pursuant to a specified judicial process, and requires that designation to be included in the registration records of the dog. Existing law defines the term “vicious dog” to include, among others, dogs seized pursuant to specified animal cruelty laws. This bill would delete this category of dog from the above-specified definition of “vicious dog.”

AB 2269

Animal shelters: research animals: prohibitions.

Waldron

This bill would prohibit a person or animal shelter entity that accepts animals from the public or takes in stray or unwanted animals from selling, giving, or otherwise transferring a living animal to a research facility or animal dealer. The bill would also prohibit a research facility or animal dealer from procuring, purchasing, receiving, accepting, or using a living animal for the purpose of medical or biological teaching, research, or study, or any other kind of experimentation, if that animal is transferred from, or received from, an animal shelter. The bill would prohibit a person or animal shelter entity from euthanizing an animal for the purpose of transferring the carcass to a research facility or animal dealer.

AB 2505

Animals: euthanasia.

Quirk

This bill would, with respect to the killing of a dog or cat, prohibit a person from using carbon dioxide gas.

SB 945

Pet boarding facilities.

Monning

This bill would establish procedures for the care and maintenance of pets boarded at a pet boarding facility, including, but not limited to, sanitation, provision of enrichment devices, health of the pet, and safety. The bill would also prohibit a person convicted of an offense related to the welfare of animals from operating a pet boarding facility or from being employed as an employee of a pet boarding facility.

SB 1062

Elephants: prohibited treatment.

Lara

This bill would, beginning January 1, 2018, prohibit any person who houses, possesses, or is in direct contact with an elephant from using, or permitting an employee, agent, or contractor to use, a bullhook, ankus, baseball bat, axe handle, pitchfork, or other device designed to inflict pain for the purpose of training or controlling the behavior of an elephant. A person who violates these provisions would not be subject to criminal penalty but would be subject to civil penalties and revocation of the Department of Fish and Wildlife permit.

SB 1200

Animal cruelty: Criminal statistics.

Jackson

This bill would require the Department of Justice’s annual report to the Governor to include information concerning arrests for animal cruelty.

ACR 9

Pet Care Education Month.

McCarty

Declares the month of January 2016 as Pet Care Education Month and would request Californians to observe the month by ensuring that their companion animals receive the proper preventative care by establishing a financial plan for pet health emergencies and by contributing to charitable organizations that provide low-cost spay and neuter services and vaccinations or funds to help low-income individuals pay for veterinary care.

 


California Legislature FAQ

1. How does a bill become law?

2.
Where can I get detailed information on a particular bill?

3.
I don't know who my senator and assembly member are. How can I find out?

4.
How many senators and assembly members are there in California?

5.
Why is my senate district different than my assembly district?

6.
How often are state legislators elected? Does California have terms limits?

 

1.  How does a bill become a law?
When one of our legislators -- senator or assembly member -- seeks to introduce a bill, that legislator works with the Office of Legislative Counsel to draft the bill.  If the author of the bill is a senator, the draft bill is introduced on the floor of the Senate; if the author of the bill is an assembly member, the bill is read or introduced in the Assembly.  Thereafter, the bill is sent to the Office of State Printing.

A minimum of 30 days from the date of introduction, the bill is sent to the Rules Committee of the house in which the bill was introduced for assignment to the appropriate policy committee(s) for hearing.  At the hearing, the author presents the bill and testimony is heard in support of and in opposition to the bill from members of the public.  The committee then votes on the bill, which yields one of three possible outcomes.  The bill is either 1) passed, 2) passed as amended by the committee, or 3) defeated.

If the bill is passed (either the original or as amended), it is read for a second time in the house in which the bill was introduced and then the bill is assigned for a third reading.  Prior to the third reading, an analysis of the bill is prepared.  During the third reading, the author explains the bill, members discuss the bill, and a vote is taken by roll call.  Bills that require appropriation or take effect immediately require 27 votes in the Senate (out of a possible total of 40 ) and 54 votes in the Assembly (out of a possible total of  80).  All other bills require 21 votes in the Senate and 41 votes in the Assembly.

If the bill is passed, it is then sent to the other house, where the above process is repeated.  If the bill is amended in the second house, it must be sent back to the original house for approval.  If the original house does not approve the bill, it is sent to a  two-house conference committee to negotiate a bill that is satisfactory to both houses.  If a comprise is reached, the bill is sent back to both houses for a vote.

If the bill is approved by both the Senate and the Assembly, it is sent to the Governor, who may take one of three actions.  The Governor may 1) sign the bill into law, 2) allow the bill to become law without signature, or 3) veto the bill.  If the Governor vetoes the bill, it can still be passed by a 2/3 vote in both the Senate and Assembly.  If the bill becomes law, it generally goes into effect on January 1 of the following year.

2.  Where can I get detailed information on a particular bill?
Go to the Office of Legislative Counsel's official California legislative information website at www.leginfo.ca.gov and click on the "Bill Information" tab.  You will see detailed information about a bill, including its author, amendments, history, status, and analyses.

3.  I don't know who my senator and assembly member are. How can I find out?
Go to the Office of Legislative Counsel's official California legislative information website at www.leginfo.ca.gov and click on the "Your Legislature" tab.  You will also find useful links to legislators' web pages, legislative committees, the legislative calendar, and other related topics.

4.  How many senators and assembly members are there in California?
There are 40 Senators and 80 Assembly persons.

5.  Why is my senate district different than my assembly district?
California is divided into 40 Senate districts.  Within each Senate district, there are two Assembly districts, for a total of 80 Assembly districts.  To view a map of the Senate districts, click here.  To view a map of the Assembly districts in PDF format, click here.

6.  How often are state legislators elected? Does California have terms limits?
One-half of the Senators are elected or re-elected every 2 years for four-year terms.  A Senator may serve a total of two 4-year terms.  All Assembly members are elected or re-elected every two years for 2-year terms.  An Assembly member may serve a total of three 2-year terms.

 

[Home] [About Us] [Membership] [Training] [Humane Officers] [Legislation] [Catalog] [Conference] [Careers] [Humane Society/SPCA]

Each of the SPCAs and humane societies in the United States is individually incorporated and operated. They are not directly affiliated with each other or with any national groups, such as the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) and the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS).

2005-2014 State Humane Association of California